Research Study Directory

Improving the health of women and infants.

Research studies are designed to advance scientific knowledge while protecting the people who volunteer to participate.

Woman’s Hospital Research Center conducts clinical studies and molecular biology/genetic research, and collaborates with institutions across the world. We follow specific regulations to ensure patients’ safety and privacy.

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Questions about a study?  Want to talk to someone about enrolling?  Suggestions or concerns about research?

Email us at research@womans.org or call us 225-231-5275

Learn if you can be a part of our mission by participating in the following studies.

Weight Loss/Diabetes

SWEET Study

Did you know research has shown the risk for getting type 2 diabetes is nearly 10 times higher for women who have had gestational diabetes during pregnancy compared to women who have not?*

Researchers at Woman’s Hospital are launching the SWEET Study to learn if a once-a-week medicine, called semaglutide, can help women get rid of prediabetes and have healthy blood sugar levels after a pregnancy with gestational diabetes. The study lasts for 9 months and will compensate participants up to $800.

More about semaglutide (Ozempic®): Studies have already shown that the FDA approved drug semaglutide (Ozempic®) can help treat type 2 diabetes. For women who have recently given birth following a diagnosis of gestational diabetes, Ozempic® may be able to improve blood sugar levels, treat pre-diabetes, help with weight loss, and get you back to living your best life.

Do I qualify to join the SWEET Study?

  • You must be less than 3 years postpartum (no more than 36 months after having your baby) 
  • Not pregnant or breastfeeding right now
  • Had gestational diabetes in your most recent pregnancy
  • Be between 18 and 45 years old

What does the study involve?

  • The study will last about 9 months, will be 7 visits, and involves:
  • Blood draws, urine collections, and lab tests to measure your general health, diabetes status (how your body handles sugar), and pregnancy status (see if you are pregnant or not).
  • Measurement of your body weight, height, blood pressure, and a body composition scan (called a DEXA) to measure how much body fat you have.
  • Wearing a small device to measure your blood sugar levels for 10 days
  • Record the food you have been eating for 24 hours

Why should I participate?

If you are eligible, you will receive detailed labs and insight into your current health status. While the medicine used in this study has been used to improve blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes, it is not guaranteed to have similar effects in women with pre-diabetes. You would also get up to $800 for taking part in the study.

How do I sign up?

Complete our SWEET Study interest form »

Or you may text/call 225-428-7464, or email research@womans.org to get started.

COVID-19 Research Studies

Pandemic Pregnancy Study

Woman’s Hospital is partnering with Pennington Biomedical Research Center and Tulane University to see how pregnant women in Louisiana felt during the COVID-19 pandemic and how the pandemic affected pregnancy outcomes for moms and babies. 

About 4,000 women who had a baby between June 10, 2020 and September 30, 2021 will participate in this research.

We are inviting moms who had a baby during the pandemic to participate in a study, which includes completing this survey that will take up to 20 minutes.

You will receive a $15 e-gift card for completing the survey.

To sign up: Complete this form, email research@womans.org or call 225-231-5275

If you don’t see a study that fits you…

Complete this form and we can contact you about future studies you may be able to take part in! You may also email research@womans.org or call 225-231-5275 anytime to learn more or see if you qualify for any study.

Gynecologic Cancer Clinical Trials

Woman's actively participates in ongoing clinical cancer research. 

A Phase III Study Comparing Single-Agent Olaparib or the Combination of Cediranib and Olaparib to Standard Platinum-Based Chemotherapy in Women with Recurrent Platinum-Sensitive Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer 
This randomized phase III trial studies olaparib or cediranib maleate and olaparib to see how well they work compared with standard platinum-based chemotherapy in treating patients with platinum-sensitive ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer that has come back. Olaparib and cediranib maleate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Cediranib maleate may stop the growth of ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer by blocking the growth of new blood vessels necessary for tumor growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin, paclitaxel, gemcitabine hydrochloride, and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether olaparib or cediranib maleate and olaparib is more effective than standard platinum-based chemotherapy in treating patients with platinum-sensitive ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer.

A Phase III, Multicenter, Randomized, Study of Atezolizumab Versus Placebo Administered in Combination With Paclitaxel, Carboplatin, and Bevacizumab to Patients With Newly-Diagnosed Stage III or Stage IV Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer
This is a Phase III, global, double-blind, 2-arm randomized study designed to compare the efficacy and safety of atezolizumab + paclitaxel + carboplatin + bevacizumab versus placebo + paclitaxel + carboplatin + bevacizumab. Study participants will have Stage 3 or 4 ovarian cancer (OC), fallopian tube cancer (FTC), or primary peritoneal cancer (PPC) with macroscopic residual disease postoperatively (i.e., after primary tumor reductive surgery) or who will undergo neoadjuvant therapy followed by interval surgery.

Diet and Physical Activity Change or Usual Care in Improving Progression-Free Survival in Patients with Previously Treated Stage II, III, or IV Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer
This randomized phase III trial studies whether changes in diet and physical activity can increase the length of survival without the return of cancer (progression-free survival) compared with usual care in patients with previously treated stage II, III, or IV ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer. A healthy diet and physical activity program and counseling may help patients make healthier lifestyle choices. It is not yet known whether changes in diet and exercise may help increase progression-free survival in patients with previously treated cancer

CA-IX, p16, Proliferative Markers, and HPV in Diagnosing Cervical Lesions in Patients with Abnormal Cervical Cells
This research trial studies carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA-IX), p16, proliferative markers, and human papilloma virus (HPV) in diagnosing cervical lesions in patients with abnormal cervical cells. Studying biomarkers in abnormal cervical cells may improve the ability to find cervical lesions and plan effective treatment.

A Randomized Phase III trial of Radiation Therapy with or without Chemotherapy in Patients with Stage I or Stage II Cervical Cancer who Previously Underwent Surgery
This randomized phase III trial studies radiation therapy with chemotherapy to see how well it works compared to radiation therapy alone in treating patients with stage I or stage II cervical cancer who previously underwent surgery. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. It is not yet known whether giving radiation therapy together with chemotherapy is more effective than radiation therapy alone in treating patients with cervical cancer. 

A Phase II Trial Evaluating Radiation Therapy, Gemcitabine Hydrochloride, and Cisplatin in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Cancer of the Vulva
This phase II trial studies how well radiation therapy works when given with gemcitabine hydrochloride and cisplatin work in treating patients with squamous cell cancer of the vulva that has spread from where it started to nearby tissue or lymph nodes. Specialized radiation therapy that delivers a high dose of radiation directly to the tumor may kill more tumor cells and cause less damage to normal tissue. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine hydrochloride and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving radiation therapy together with gemcitabine hydrochloride and cisplatin may kill more tumor cells.

A Randomized Phase II/III Study of Paclitaxel/Carboplatin/Metformin (NSC#91485) Versus Paclitaxel/Carboplatin/Placebo as Initial Therapy for Measurable Stage III or IVA, Stage IVB, or Recurrent Endometrial Cancer
This randomized phase II/III trial studies how well paclitaxel, carboplatin, and metformin hydrochloride works and compares it to paclitaxel, carboplatin, and placebo in treating patients with endometrial cancer that is stage III, IV, or has come back. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Metformin hydrochloride may help paclitaxel and carboplatin work better by making cancer cells more sensitive to the drugs. It is not yet known whether paclitaxel and carboplatin is more effective with or without metformin hydrochloride in treating endometrial cancer.

A Phase 3, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Multicenter Study of Niraparib Maintenance Treatment in Patients With Advanced Ovarian Cancer Following Response on Front-Line Platinum-Based Chemotherapy
This study is a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled (2:1 niraparib:placebo) study in patients with Stage III or IV ovarian cancer. Patients must have completed front-line platinum based regimen with a physician-assessed response of Complete Response (CR) or Partial Response (PR). Additionally, patients must have a normal or >90% decrease in cancer antigen 125 (CA-125) following front-line platinum treatment. The study will assess the efficacy of niraparib as maintenance treatment, as measured by PFS.

To learn about the most recent gynecologic cancer studies, and find out if you are a candidate, please contact Ashley Marks, BSN, RN, 225-924-8215

Breast Cancer Clinical Trials

The medical staff at Woman's Hospital supports breast cancer clinical trial research in coordination with Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center in Baton Rouge.

A Randomized Phase III Trial Comparing Axillary Lymph Node Dissection to Axillary Radiation In Breast Cancer Patients (Ct1-3 N1) who Have Positive Sentinel Lymph Node Disease After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy
This randomized phase III trial studies lymph node dissection and radiation therapy to see how well it works compared to radiation therapy alone in treating patients with breast cancer previously treated with chemotherapy and surgery. Lymph node dissection may remove cancer cells that have spread to nearby lymph nodes in patients with breast cancer. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x rays to kill tumor cells. It is not yet known if radiation therapy works better alone or with lymph node dissection in treating patients with breast cancer previously treated with chemotherapy and surgery.

A Randomized Phase III Clinical Trial Evaluating Post-Mastectomy Chestwall and Regional Nodal XRT and Post-Lumpectomy Regional Nodal XRT in Patients With Positive Axillary Nodes Before Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Who Convert to Pathologically Negative Axillary Nodes After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy
This randomized phase III trial studies radiation therapy to the breast, chest wall and lymph nodes (comprehensive) compared to standard radiation therapy to the breast in treating patients with early-stage breast cancer previously treated with chemotherapy and surgery. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x rays to kill tumor cells. It is not yet known whether comprehensive radiation therapy is more effective than standard radiation therapy in treating patients with early-stage breast cancer.

For a complete list of current clinical trials, visit Mary Bird Perkins » 

If you are interested in participating in a clinical trial, always contact your physician to discuss options that are available to you. For further information or questions about participation in clinical trials, you may contact a clinical research representative at 225-215-1353, or email us.

Imaging/Mammography

 Digital Tomosynthesis Mammography and Digital Mammography in Screening Patients for Breast Cancer

TRIAL NUMBER: EA1151 TMIST FLYER [PDF] »
Purpose: This randomized phase III trial studies digital tomosynthesis mammography and digital mammography in screening patients for breast cancer. Screening for breast cancer with tomosynthesis mammography may be superior to digital mammography for breast cancer screening and may help reduce the need for additional imaging or treatment.

TMIST is a randomized breast screening trial that will help researchers learn about the best ways to find breast cancer in women who have no symptoms. It compares two Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved types of digital mammography: standard digital mammography (2-D) with a newer technology called tomosynthesis mammography (3-D). 2-D mammography takes pictures from two sides of the breast to create a flat image. 3-D mammography images are taken from different angles around the breast and then built into a 3-D-like image. Researchers are doing this trial because they do not know if 3-D is better than 2-D mammography for breast cancer screening.

Another important aspect of the trial is to build a tissue bank for future research. All women who join the trial will be asked to submit tissue samples, such as blood and swabs of cells from inside their mouths. Researchers hope that the information from these tissue samples will help decide the best ways to screen for breast cancer in the future by taking a person’s genetics and other personal risk factors into account.

Who Can Enroll in TMIST:
Women ages 45 to 74 who are planning to get a routine screening mammogram are eligible for this trial.

Physicians: Dr. James Ruiz

Offered in: Baton Rouge (Woman’s Hospital)

For additional information, visit https://www.cancer.gov. To join the TMIST trial call 225-215-1353.

Pregnancy

Miracle of Life Study

The Miracle of Life study is trying to find a blood test that can predict pregnancy complications, like having your baby too early, preeclampsia, and gestational diabetes.  The study will collect moms’ blood before these complications happen. Then, once they deliver their babies, the study will look at what happened in their pregnancy, like when they delivered their babies or if they had gestational diabetes. They will see if they can link those complications to any signals in their blood. If you join, you may help future moms to better prepare for their pregnancy and keep their babies healthy. To sign up, complete this form.

Can I join?

  • Are you less than 22 weeks pregnant?
  • Are you 18 years old or older?
  • Have you had an ultrasound in your first trimester?

If yes, you may qualify for the Miracle of Life study.

If you join…

  • The study visits takes about 10 minutes. You will be given a $50 gift card after your visit.
  • The study asks pregnant women to donate less than 2 tablespoons of blood. The study also asks for your OK to give your medical information from your pregnancy like your measurements (e.g., blood pressure), test results (e.g., ultrasound), and doctor’s notes.
  • Before you start, you will read and sign an informed consent form. This form gives you the details about the study. Before you sign, you have the chance to ask any questions.
  • All data and blood given for the study will get a code instead of your name to protect your privacy. They will only ever be used for research.

To sign up: Complete this form, text or call 225-250-8502, or email research@womans.org

Consent Forms