Research Study Directory

Improving the health of women and infants.

Research studies are designed to advance scientific knowledge while protecting the people who volunteer to participate.

Woman’s Hospital Research Center conducts clinical studies and molecular biology/genetic research, and collaborates with institutions across the world. We follow specific regulations to ensure patients’ safety and privacy.

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Safety & Protection - Woman’s Institutional Review Board and Office of Human Protections

All research studies are submitted to the Woman's Research and Development Committee. Studies involving human subjects are referred to the Woman's Hospital Foundation Institutional Review Board for review.

Woman’s IRB leadership includes:

The IRB reviews the protocol, consent form, and all other documents for each study. Its main job is to ensure the study participants are protected and that the balance of potential risks and benefits is appropriate. The IRB conducts regular reviews of each active study.


Questions about a study?  Want to talk to someone about enrolling?  Suggestions or concerns about research?

Email us at research@womans.org or call us 225-231-5275

Learn if you can be a part of our mission by participating in the following studies.

COVID-19 Research Studies

Woman’s Hospital is launching several research programs to help understand the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. All the information about treatment and medicines to help patients with COVID-19 are a result of people like you helping to move science forward!

We have several studies that you may qualify for if you are pregnant, have been tested for COVID-19, or have had the COVID-19 illness. 

For pregnant women

Pregnant During COVID-19 Survey Study: This study will help us learn about the health and experiences of being pregnant during the COVID-19 pandemic. You will complete a first survey to collect information about your health, your pregnancy, your work and childcare changes, and feelings of stress so far being pregnant during the COVID-19 outbreak. Then, each week during the rest of your pregnancy, you will be sent a survey to document your social distancing practices, COVID-19 symptoms and update us on changes to your lifestyle and mental health.

To sign up: Complete this form, email research@womans.org or call 225-231-5275.

For new moms

This survey is for moms that delivered their babies on or after March 1, 2020 and is part of the Pregnant During COVID-19 Survey Study. You do not have to have completed any surveys during your pregnancy to participate in this postpartum survey. You will complete a one-time survey to collect information about your experience delivering your baby during the COVID-19 pandemic, your health, your pregnancy, and feelings of stress.

To sign up: Complete this form, email research@womans.org or call 225-231-5275.

For healthcare workers

Impact of COVID-19 Pandemic on Healthcare Workers Survey: This research study will help us learn how the COVID-19 pandemic is affecting our healthcare workers’ health, feelings, behaviors, and home/work situations. You will complete a 15 minute survey to collect information about your job, your physical and mental health, and your experience so far working as a healthcare worker during the COVID-19 outbreak.

To participate: Click here to begin, email research@womans.org, or call 225-231-5275.

For physicians-in-training

Impact of COVID-19 Pandemic on Physicians-in-Training Survey Study: This study will help us learn about the changes in training and education of physicians-in-training (medical school students, residents, and fellows) during the COVID-19 pandemic. You will complete a 15 minute survey to collect information about your job, your physical and mental health, and your experience so far working as a physician-in-training during the COVID-19 outbreak.

To sign up: Complete this form, email research@womans.org or call 225-231-5275.

For anyone who has been tested for COVID-19

This is the one-time survey for anyone (women, men, pregnant, not pregnant!) who has recently been tested for COVID-19. 

To sign up: Complete this form, email research@womans.org or call 225-231-5275.

For anyone who has been told they have or probably have COVID-19

This is the one-time survey for anyone (women, men, pregnant, not pregnant!) who has recently been told by their doctor or healthcare provider that they have or probably have COVID-19. 

To sign up: Complete this form, email research@womans.org or call 225-231-5275.

If you don’t see a study that fits you…

Complete this form and we can contact you about future studies you may be able to take part in! You may also email research@womans.org or call 225-231-5275 anytime to learn more or see if you qualify for any study.

Gynecologic Cancer Clinical Trials

Woman's actively participates in ongoing clinical cancer research. 

A Phase III Study Comparing Single-Agent Olaparib or the Combination of Cediranib and Olaparib to Standard Platinum-Based Chemotherapy in Women with Recurrent Platinum-Sensitive Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer 
This randomized phase III trial studies olaparib or cediranib maleate and olaparib to see how well they work compared with standard platinum-based chemotherapy in treating patients with platinum-sensitive ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer that has come back. Olaparib and cediranib maleate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Cediranib maleate may stop the growth of ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer by blocking the growth of new blood vessels necessary for tumor growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin, paclitaxel, gemcitabine hydrochloride, and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether olaparib or cediranib maleate and olaparib is more effective than standard platinum-based chemotherapy in treating patients with platinum-sensitive ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer.

A Phase III, Multicenter, Randomized, Study of Atezolizumab Versus Placebo Administered in Combination With Paclitaxel, Carboplatin, and Bevacizumab to Patients With Newly-Diagnosed Stage III or Stage IV Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer
This is a Phase III, global, double-blind, 2-arm randomized study designed to compare the efficacy and safety of atezolizumab + paclitaxel + carboplatin + bevacizumab versus placebo + paclitaxel + carboplatin + bevacizumab. Study participants will have Stage 3 or 4 ovarian cancer (OC), fallopian tube cancer (FTC), or primary peritoneal cancer (PPC) with macroscopic residual disease postoperatively (i.e., after primary tumor reductive surgery) or who will undergo neoadjuvant therapy followed by interval surgery.

Diet and Physical Activity Change or Usual Care in Improving Progression-Free Survival in Patients with Previously Treated Stage II, III, or IV Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer
This randomized phase III trial studies whether changes in diet and physical activity can increase the length of survival without the return of cancer (progression-free survival) compared with usual care in patients with previously treated stage II, III, or IV ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer. A healthy diet and physical activity program and counseling may help patients make healthier lifestyle choices. It is not yet known whether changes in diet and exercise may help increase progression-free survival in patients with previously treated cancer

CA-IX, p16, Proliferative Markers, and HPV in Diagnosing Cervical Lesions in Patients with Abnormal Cervical Cells
This research trial studies carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA-IX), p16, proliferative markers, and human papilloma virus (HPV) in diagnosing cervical lesions in patients with abnormal cervical cells. Studying biomarkers in abnormal cervical cells may improve the ability to find cervical lesions and plan effective treatment.

A Randomized Phase III trial of Radiation Therapy with or without Chemotherapy in Patients with Stage I or Stage II Cervical Cancer who Previously Underwent Surgery
This randomized phase III trial studies radiation therapy with chemotherapy to see how well it works compared to radiation therapy alone in treating patients with stage I or stage II cervical cancer who previously underwent surgery. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. It is not yet known whether giving radiation therapy together with chemotherapy is more effective than radiation therapy alone in treating patients with cervical cancer. 

A Phase II Trial Evaluating Radiation Therapy, Gemcitabine Hydrochloride, and Cisplatin in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Cancer of the Vulva
This phase II trial studies how well radiation therapy works when given with gemcitabine hydrochloride and cisplatin work in treating patients with squamous cell cancer of the vulva that has spread from where it started to nearby tissue or lymph nodes. Specialized radiation therapy that delivers a high dose of radiation directly to the tumor may kill more tumor cells and cause less damage to normal tissue. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine hydrochloride and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving radiation therapy together with gemcitabine hydrochloride and cisplatin may kill more tumor cells.

A Randomized Phase II/III Study of Paclitaxel/Carboplatin/Metformin (NSC#91485) Versus Paclitaxel/Carboplatin/Placebo as Initial Therapy for Measurable Stage III or IVA, Stage IVB, or Recurrent Endometrial Cancer
This randomized phase II/III trial studies how well paclitaxel, carboplatin, and metformin hydrochloride works and compares it to paclitaxel, carboplatin, and placebo in treating patients with endometrial cancer that is stage III, IV, or has come back. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Metformin hydrochloride may help paclitaxel and carboplatin work better by making cancer cells more sensitive to the drugs. It is not yet known whether paclitaxel and carboplatin is more effective with or without metformin hydrochloride in treating endometrial cancer.

A Phase 3, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Multicenter Study of Niraparib Maintenance Treatment in Patients With Advanced Ovarian Cancer Following Response on Front-Line Platinum-Based Chemotherapy
This study is a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled (2:1 niraparib:placebo) study in patients with Stage III or IV ovarian cancer. Patients must have completed front-line platinum based regimen with a physician-assessed response of Complete Response (CR) or Partial Response (PR). Additionally, patients must have a normal or >90% decrease in cancer antigen 125 (CA-125) following front-line platinum treatment. The study will assess the efficacy of niraparib as maintenance treatment, as measured by PFS.

To learn about the most recent gynecologic cancer studies, and find out if you are a candidate, please contact Ashley Marks, BSN, RN, 225-924-8215

Breast Cancer Clinical Trials

The medical staff at Woman's Hospital supports breast cancer clinical trial research in coordination with Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center in Baton Rouge.

A Randomized Phase III Trial Comparing Axillary Lymph Node Dissection to Axillary Radiation In Breast Cancer Patients (Ct1-3 N1) who Have Positive Sentinel Lymph Node Disease After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy
This randomized phase III trial studies lymph node dissection and radiation therapy to see how well it works compared to radiation therapy alone in treating patients with breast cancer previously treated with chemotherapy and surgery. Lymph node dissection may remove cancer cells that have spread to nearby lymph nodes in patients with breast cancer. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x rays to kill tumor cells. It is not yet known if radiation therapy works better alone or with lymph node dissection in treating patients with breast cancer previously treated with chemotherapy and surgery.

A Randomized Phase III Clinical Trial Evaluating Post-Mastectomy Chestwall and Regional Nodal XRT and Post-Lumpectomy Regional Nodal XRT in Patients With Positive Axillary Nodes Before Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Who Convert to Pathologically Negative Axillary Nodes After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy
This randomized phase III trial studies radiation therapy to the breast, chest wall and lymph nodes (comprehensive) compared to standard radiation therapy to the breast in treating patients with early-stage breast cancer previously treated with chemotherapy and surgery. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x rays to kill tumor cells. It is not yet known whether comprehensive radiation therapy is more effective than standard radiation therapy in treating patients with early-stage breast cancer.

For a complete list of current clinical trials, visit Mary Bird Perkins » 

If you are interested in participating in a clinical trial, always contact your physician to discuss options that are available to you. For further information or questions about participation in clinical trials, you may contact a clinical research representative at 225-215-1353, or email us.

TMIST

 Digital Tomosynthesis Mammography and Digital Mammography in Screening Patients for Breast Cancer

TRIAL NUMBER: EA1151 TMIST FLYER [PDF] »
Purpose: This randomized phase III trial studies digital tomosynthesis mammography and digital mammography in screening patients for breast cancer. Screening for breast cancer with tomosynthesis mammography may be superior to digital mammography for breast cancer screening and may help reduce the need for additional imaging or treatment.

TMIST is a randomized breast screening trial that will help researchers learn about the best ways to find breast cancer in women who have no symptoms. It compares two Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved types of digital mammography: standard digital mammography (2-D) with a newer technology called tomosynthesis mammography (3-D). 2-D mammography takes pictures from two sides of the breast to create a flat image. 3-D mammography images are taken from different angles around the breast and then built into a 3-D-like image. Researchers are doing this trial because they do not know if 3-D is better than 2-D mammography for breast cancer screening.

Another important aspect of the trial is to build a tissue bank for future research. All women who join the trial will be asked to submit tissue samples, such as blood and swabs of cells from inside their mouths. Researchers hope that the information from these tissue samples will help decide the best ways to screen for breast cancer in the future by taking a person’s genetics and other personal risk factors into account.

Who Can Enroll in TMIST:
Women ages 45 to 74 who are planning to get a routine screening mammogram are eligible for this trial.

Physicians: Dr. James Ruiz

Offered in: Baton Rouge (Woman’s Hospital)

For additional information, visit https://www.cancer.gov. To join the TMIST trial call 225-215-1353.